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Activity

Introducing the Global Goals

Introducing the Global Goals

Use this guide to introduce the Global Goals to your students.

What are the Global Goals?

The Global Goals are a call for action by all countries to promote prosperity for everyone while protecting the planet.

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) or Global Goals are a collection of 17 interlinked goals with actions agreed by all 193 member countries of the United Nations in 2015.

It is the most ambitious international agreement ever made, to eradicate poverty and inequality, protect health and prevent climate change.

Introductory video

This short film addresses why we need the Global Goals and what they are. Show your students this video, then try one of the activities below.

The animation, introduced by Malala Yousafzai and written by Sir Ken Robinson, is a great way to introduce the Global Goals.

Activity 1: Global Goals superpower!

In this activity students will explore how they could achieve the Goals if they could do anything.

Age 8-11, length - 30 mins

Use whole group discussion and small group work to explore the Goals, understand why they exist, learn about some of the impacts and challenges and use the concept of super powers to explore how ideas for solutions can contribute to positive change. 

Activity 2: Think like you are the President!

In this activity students will discuss why we need the Global Goals.

Age 11-13, length - 15 mins

Display the question: ‘What are the biggest problems faced by people in our community/country/worldwide?' (Adapt as appropriate).

Ask the children what they think about this question. Encourage them to think from the perspectives of others - “Think like you are the president of the country!”. Give students some time to discuss in pairs, then take some suggestions from the group. These could be written onto a board at the front.

Show students the Global Goals grid (available to download at the bottom of this guide). Compare their lists of problems with The Global Goals. Which Goal(s) do each of their problems relate to?

In a larger group you could have 17 students stand at the front with their backs to the room. Each student holds a sheet of paper with one of The Global Goals written on it. When someone suggests the problem tackled by their Goal they turn around.

Activity 3: Connecting the Global Goals to Real-Life

In this activity students will explore how they could help achieve the Goals and what that future would look like.

Age 8-13, length - 30 mins

Download the Global Goals grid here



The activities are created by World's Largest Lesson